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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 27, 2019 9:00am-10:01am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with rachel burden and ben thompson. our headlines today... cosmetic clinics are accused of fuelling a mental health epidemic. england's top doctor tells firms they need to do more to protect vulnerable clients. sri lanka's security forces say at least 15 people, including six children, have been killed after an explosion at a suspected islamist militant hideout. fresh talks to try to break the political deadlock in northern ireland are welcomed by the white house — following the death of lyra mckee.
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more than 90 labour politicians demand thatjeremy corbyn commits to another referendum in the european election. five—star liverpool go top again. they thrash huddersfield at anfield to overtake manchester city again, so the pressure is now on city to respond at burnley tomorrow. plus — push—ups, press—ups, sprints and squats. i'll be finding out what it takes to make a crossfit champion. and in weather, storm hannah is set to bring many of us a windy, wet and cool day. i'll have all the details right here on breakfast. it's saturday 27 april. our top story... clinics that provide cosmetic procedures, such as fillers and botox injections, are helping to fuel a mental health and anxiety epidemic. that's according to the medical director of nhs england. professor stephen powis is calling for an official register of all providers and for better training to protect vulnerable clients from quick fixes, as our global health correspondent
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richard galpin reports. cosmetic procedures like botox injections and fillers are popular and easily available — notjust in clinics, they were asking me if i would like to have anything else done and they said maybe you could have a bit of filler in your cheeks and your chin and bounce it out better and i never once heard my medical history. i never hid the fact i had battled anorexia, it was always there on my form. the nhs is concerned there is a link between young people's mental health and these kinds of procedures. practitioners are performing this procedure are firstly to be trained that they are aware that there may be vulnerabilities, mental health problems, and then check in desk for them before those procedures are done and if thou identify and signpost or refer to other
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professionals who may be able to help them in a better way. to try to tackle this, the nhs wants all those providing cosmetic procedures to sign up to an online training programme teaching them how to recognise the signs and symptoms of vulnerability and mental ill health, and ensuring they tell customers where to get help if they show signs of being vulnerable. but the course is voluntary and so far, only 10% of providers have signed up for the training. richard galpin, bbc news. 15 bodies, including six children, are reported to have been found in a house where sri lankan security forces exchanged fire with suspected islamic state militants. searches for extremists have been stepped up following the suicide attacks on churches and hotels last weekend, which killed at least 253 people and wounded hundreds more. jon donnison has this report. all week, the security forces in sri lanka have been warning of further attacks. they were right.
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a raid in the east of the country found a massive bomb—making factory — gelignite, ball bearings, and explosives in huge quantities. also uncovered, an is flag. nearby, in another raid, police were involved in a gun battle with suspected extremists. 15 bodies were recovered, among them some civilians. in an interview with the bbc‘s clive myrie, the prime minister ranil wickremesing was asked about what many see as the failings of his government, and why he'd not been aware there had been intelligence warning of the easter sunday attacks. unfortunately, i didn't know. what do you do when you are out of the loop? you're talking about not being in the loop? you are the prime minister! you're number two on the national security council! that is the critical issue. we need to find out why i was not in the loop,
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who was in the loop and who wasn't in the loop. meanwhile, the clean—up has begun at the saint anthony's shrine church in colombo, targeted in last week's blast, but in a sign that the threat remains, the catholic church across the country has cancelled all masses scheduled for this sunday amid fears of more attacks. jon donnison, bbc news. more than 90 labour mps and meps — including a number of shadow ministers — have signed a letter demanding the party commits to holding another referendum on any brexit deal. we're joined from our london newsroom by our political correspondent susana mendonca. it is the tricky one for the labour leader to navigate here. what's going to happen? it is difficult. we know the nec ruling body of labour will decide on tuesday what is going on its manifesto which probably is the reason behind the timing of this letter because these mps and meps wa nt to letter because these mps and meps want to make sure that labour basically in that manifesto commits
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itself to this idea of holding another what they confirm —— referred to as a confirmatory referendum or vote for people to say whether they support the deal that is done, no—deal has been done so far with the government on brexit. the problem for labour is that on one side they have got labour mps and meps and labour members who want the party to commit to another referendum but then on the other side there are mps in constituencies in the north of england and a lot of labour voters in constituencies that are marginal ones that labour really need to get in order to win a general election where people voted for brexit and would perhaps feel let down if labour committed itself to that. in terms of labour policy, it says that labour has all options left on the table including another referendum, but it's whether or not labour will talk about that i suppose in the run—up to these european elections. a very difficult one for the labour party. thank you,
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susana mendonca, on the upcoming european parliamentary elections. they meet on tuesday. the snp is to decide on a new currency plan for an independent scotland as its spring conference opens in edinburgh. the party leadership, including first minister nicola sturgeon, wants scotland to keep the pound in the years after independence. they say the country could then look to introduce its own currency if six economic tests are met. but some activists believe this does not go far enough, and want a separate currency introduced sooner. more than 1700 properties in south—west england, south wales and the midlands, have been left without power, as storm hannah hits the uk. winds of over 80mph and heavy rain is expected to pass through southern wales and south—west england this morning. travel disruption is highly likely. politicians in northern ireland have been urged to do everything they can to restore power—sharing when they take part in fresh talks next month. the united states welcomed the news
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— saying it supported efforts to break the political deadlock, which has been in place since 2017. 0ur ireland correspondent emma vardy reports. at lyra mckee's funeral, the words of fr martin magill received a standing ovation when he shamed politicians for failing to reconcile their differences to restore devolution. in his first interview since the address, he urged politicians to listen to the people. i get the sense that people want our politicians to move and they want them to move now, and by that i mean in terms of entering into those talks and in a way that will actually bring a positive result at the end of them. political adversaries in northern ireland have been brought together by the death of the journalist who was shot during rioting in londonderry. more than two years since power—sharing collapsed in northern ireland, yesterday, the british and irish governments announced that in the wake of lyra's death, there would be fresh discussions to try to reach
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a new power—sharing agreement, beginning after the local elections next week. and we will work with all the parties to help them do that. but repeated rounds of talks have previously failed, and big sticking points between the parties remain. emma vardy, bbc news. here's a picture for you. if you are inspiring secret agent you need to check this out because the idea you are supposed to crack the message behind the picture. the cia has joined instagram and has posted its first mission to get a younger audience on board. it is captioned i spy audience on board. it is captioned i spy with my little eye and it shows a desk scattered with curiously priced but significant objects from a curly grey wig, i guess that's self—explanatory, to a pile of foreign banknotes. this is part of an effort by the spy agency to recruit a younger generation of officers, agents and analysts, but
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each object on the table is of significance even the time the clock is second. have a look. it is on instagram. see if you can look out watch each item represents. we will start with the clock. the significance of the clock is... the time at which the clock is set is 846, which is the time the first plane struck the north tower of the world trade centre in the 911 there are 10 or 11 if you can spot them on the well, there is the map of china, one of america's main rivals in niger when it comes to security concerns about political, geopolitical power. lots of clues on the desk, what the cia is hoping may identify some future spies. it is 10 past nine. good to help you with those this morning.
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this week a group of fathers marched on downing street to raise awareness of what's known as ‘parental alienation'. it is a term that's increasingly used in family custody and separation cases, and refers to when one parent attempts to turn the couple's child against the other parent. we're joined now by family law barrister paula rhone—adrian, and also from our london newsroom by psychotherapist charlotte friedman. good morning to both of you and thank you for being with us. pa rental thank you for being with us. parental alienation, we know in many divorce cases there is acrimony between the two separating parents, but what turns it from just being a little bit spiteful about the other pa rent to little bit spiteful about the other parent to something much more serious? what we have is a situation where there is clearly something seriously wrong and by seriously, i mean looking at damage being caused to the child of the family. that damage can be emotional and the exhibited itself emotionally with the child not wanting to go to
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school were conveying themselves in a distressing manner when they are with the other parent, i don't want to see you mummy or daddy, i don't wa nt to see you mummy or daddy, i don't want to be with you, but giving no reason why. 0rwin the child is making serious allegations against the parents they are not residing with but there is no foundation for those. they are increasingly seeing this used? sadly but yes stop i wonder what the emotional impact of all that is, but what impact does this have on a child? it is a huge impact. it's an emotional childhood trauma because it is emotional abuse. what parental alienation is as very different from the type of thing that goes on when people normally separate. it is undermining or belittling of the parent or jockeying for position. parental alienation is a psychological manipulation of a child without any
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justification with a view of excluding the other parent and creating unwarranted hostility or fear in the child against the other pa re nt fear in the child against the other parent to create a —— estrangement. it is done by lying to the child about the other parent. listening to that and seeing the harm that can do toa that and seeing the harm that can do to a child, how much weight does that then carry on court? it can carry significant weight. it's a real difficult problem for the judges to manage because there are occasions where a judge will feel that it occasions where a judge will feel thatitis occasions where a judge will feel that it is absolutely necessary to re move that it is absolutely necessary to remove the child from the parent they are living with who is causing that harm and placing them with the pa re nt that harm and placing them with the parent who they haven't ordinarily lived with. how do you prove it? it is really about investigating and across—the—board investigation by interviewing the parents by speaking to the child and obviously a child focused fashion, also addressing
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other relevant people in the child's life come at the school or social services, and there is an assessment of the child potentially by psychiatrist or psychotherapist like charlotte, and there is a long and drawn—out process and it is a painful process. charlotte, i know you are not involved in the lead to goal side of things but we will see the introduction of no—fault divorces which is one effort to try and remove the antipathy from divorce cases. do you think that could help? i think it's a very good idea to have no—fault divorce. people don't divorce easily in any event. there is any of that people wa ke event. there is any of that people wake up one morning and think i would like to have a divorce. it's not like that. there have been years or months of unhappiness and it is all thought out before people say they want to divorce. to make the actual legal process easier and to stop pointing the finger at the other person and blaming makes the idea that you have a more amiable
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cooperative and collaborative divorce more likely and of course thatis divorce more likely and of course that is going to help. but parental alienation where there is a no—fault divorce or there isn't, people who wa nt divorce or there isn't, people who want to alienate the children will do so in any event. , fathers rights groups have been campaigning on this for a long time step and rightfully so. for a long time step and rightfully so. what we are hearing this morning suggests there is an issue when it comes to gender but this isn't all about gender, is it? it isn't all about gender, is it? it isn't all about gender, is it? it isn't all about gender, it is about broken hearts. if parties are finding themselves in this situation is and parents find themselves in this, these consider mediation. the courts support mediation. they want you to try mediation. the important thing i wa nt try mediation. the important thing i want to try and get across to the viewers is mediation isn't a soft option. it is a real option recognised by the court and ultimately it is endorsed by the courts. what it does apart from
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offering you any other type of speedy resource costing you less money, all those things, what it does it allows you to move on because once the process is finished you can then start craving the relationship in whatever way and it allows the child to start grieving the process of what has happened and how they will move into the future. wise words, thank you for sharing all of that with us. good to talk to you both, polar and charlotte. really important issue and one that is getting much more attention, particularly in the courts. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. you are keeping an eye on storm hannah, matt. yes, at this time last night —— micro last week many getting into the sunshine, temperatures will struggle to get into the teens. storm hannah has already peaked with winds but still potential to cause travel disruption 01’ potential to cause travel disruption or minor damage. the tree beginning
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to leave and it could bring a branch down. we have seen 82 mph in quinn it. north and west wales we see winds of 60 or 70 mph at the moment. you can see how the storm has progressed. this is the centre putting in across northern england. it is to the west and south where we see the strongest of the winds. through much of central, southern england and wales and northern ireland the pick of the winds is this morning. 40 or 50 miles per widely and may be still touching 70 mph in west wales. fairly sporadic rain across southern and eastern england. northern ireland and north—west england, north wales and north—west england, north wales and north—west midlands, persistent rain here. for some that will last all day. 25 millimetres or 40 millimetres. could be some minor flooding with strong winds. chilly
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today. 7—9 at best. southern counties of england, only a few showers a lot of sunshine. parts will stay dry through much of the day. the lightest winds in north—west scotland where we see temperatures reaching around 14. elsewhere england and wales, winds touching gale force and picking up in north east england through this afternoon. stronger in north wales and merseyside. tonight this rain will be turning surrey through the night. showers elsewhere across england and wales and the far north of scotland. most places becoming dry. the chillier night as when the spotlight. a better day in prospect tomorrow. high pressure is the backend of storm hannah pulling about. still close enough to produce lots of cloud in london for lows of you running in the london marathon. take some waterproofs just in case. no where near as hot as last year. temperatures around 14. good luck to
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you all. cloud and eastern england tomorrow morning. 0ne you all. cloud and eastern england tomorrow morning. one or two showers. clouding over. connell, pembrokeshire and northern ireland, cloud and drizzle here will step better day tomorrow. light winds and sunshine with temperatures around 15. chilly breeze along the eastern coast of england. big improvement on today. thank you. around half a million people in the uk have a debilitating form of heart failure that doctors don't know very much about. the condition stops the heart from relaxing, meaning the muscles become too stiff to function properly. now researchers are looking into how to diagnose and treat the condition. here's our science correspondent richard westcott. around 500,000 people have a type of heart failure we know very little about.
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it's called hfpef and this is a new study to find out what makes it tick. i didn't realise i had a heart condition and i thought, why, i'm so fit? i can't be — i've been a dancer, done so much, gardening, et cetera, i don't believe it. so you are quite good at walking on the flat but not the inclines? definitely. as well as the physical tests, they will be asking patients about their lives. if i said could you walk to the shop and back again? i couldn't. this is an interesting patient group that are pretty much left to their own devices, there are not any evidence—based treatment therapies for them so it's really interesting to try to find out what would help them. it wasn't long ago that some clinicians doubted hfpef even existed. it might be common, but it's hard to recognise.
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symptoms can be similar to more known types of heart failure or even other conditions, but there is a key difference. a normal heart muscle needs to be able to expand and contract so it can pump the blood. around half the people with heart failure have a muscle that's too loose but they know how to diagnose that and treat it. the other half have a muscle that's gone thick and goes too tight and that is the one they need to find out a lot more about. this is one of the more obvious signs we see. this blue jet you see here is blood leaking back because this valve should be closing, but it's not, and that can occur because the heart muscle has become thickened. we know that there are things that we can do for this group of patients and it's just ensuring that there's a systematic way of diagnosing and managing, that people are more aware of it, and they know, right, if we get the blood pressure controlled, if we control their diabetes, if perhaps we make sure they are doing more physical activity, then we can actually improve them. researchers will study around 200
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patients for a year. well, i hope they find the reason why we go downhill like we are and i'm quite pleased, actually, that i had that call from fay last year, when she asked if i would come and participate in research, cos it must help the future. they will then recommend new ways to identify and look after the hundreds of thousands who suffer. richard westcott, bbc news. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. it is 922. time for a look at the papers. victoria dean joins it is 922. time for a look at the papers. victoria deanjoins us this morning to have a look at what's inside the papers. nice to see you. there is a lot to get through. this talk about one of the stories we have been leading on here today, the call for mental health checks if you wa nt call for mental health checks if you want any sort of cosmetic surgery or procedures. this is designed to
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prevent people who may have may be mental health problems or other issues that they are contending with. this is about referring them toa with. this is about referring them to a bit of help before they undergo something that could be quite invasive. yes. it's about trying to put in place a quicker assessment at the point where a client would go into try and receive the service. to look at whether or not it's right for them to have it and particularly trying to find whether those vulnerable individuals for whom this wouldn't be a good thing for the mental health and may be prevent them from going ahead with the procedure. but as we have been discussing already, this would only bea discussing already, this would only be a voluntary scheme so if you are determined to have whatever procedure done, there will be places you can go without having to be subject to these checks. absolutely. we have to hope that most of the mainstream providers will go for this. the other thing i would like to see is some clarity on the training that will be provided to the stop to carry out these checks because these aren't psychologists or psychiatrists, they are beauty
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therapists. helping them to work out how to ask these questions and what to look for will be really critical. its only pertinent to something like 10% of outlets that offer these kinds of services, the ones that are signed up to this joint partnership, so signed up to this joint partnership, so 90% still on top of this kind of extra assessment which is a massive gap isn't it? we have been focusing a bit on the upcoming european elections and how parties deal with that but in fact a big election in spain coming up which will have impact across the rest of europe as well. it well. this is an interesting story for a couple of reasons. it looks like a pretty chaotic election. five very different parties, quite divided, and it will almost definitely take some time for spain to pull together a coalition government. but it's also their fourth major natural election in three years, echoes of how i think most of british public feel about the idea of another general election here, and a nice reminder that whilst we are looking at europe very much through the
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brexit lens, european countries are getting on with their own agenda and problems. the catalan question still very much in play. absolutely, it remainsa big very much in play. absolutely, it remains a big part of the agenda and the selection itself, it probably won't be answered by the selection though. perhaps you might want to think about the holiday where you escape all of that and talk about brexit and european elections and all sorts of things. a special feature in the guardian looking at holidays where you go absolutely off—line. holidays where you go absolutely off-line. i thought this was fascinating. how to get away from it all, people who are offgridders. they are not all huts in the mud in the middle of nowhere. some of them look like pretty nice offerings, but at the idea of getting away. look like pretty nice offerings, but at the idea of getting awaylj look like pretty nice offerings, but at the idea of getting away. i want to show this amazing picture. this is my idea of an off grid holiday.
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this looks quite quick to switch chalets villa thing, in the middle of nowhere. that is going off—line. i think of nowhere. that is going off—line. ithinkl of nowhere. that is going off—line. i think i could do a couple of weeks with that one would do without my mobile phone. i think after a couple of days i would start to get twitchy but i like the idea of it.|j of days i would start to get twitchy but i like the idea of it. i don't think i would last a couple of days but perhaps that is the point and maybe it is good for us to have that proper break and time away. climate change, the protests we have seen in london and elsewhere in the uk over the last couple of weeks.|j london and elsewhere in the uk over the last couple of weeks. i thought this was an interesting story about the teenagers who missed days of school to protest, and that leads to lots of debate about whether that was right for them and whether playing truant for the right reason or is it wrong regardless? what they're talking here is their plan to continue with their campaign over the summer. they argue they are just as prepared to give up their free time under holiday time as they are to skip school and really trying to
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push the point that this is critical in theirview and push the point that this is critical in their view and they want to just about skiving a day of school. we got a few details about the upcoming bond film this week, i cite a few because there were some key omissions. we don't know the name of it for a start. give us a few more details. this piece is i am afraid probably sad for some campaigners around the world that the producer of the bond film has ruled out bond ever being played by a woman. she does say she is very interested in producing and casting films that have great female leads but that it just isn't right for bond to be a woman. i did notice when they were doing the preview of the new film this week that they have omitted the use of the term bond girl, haven't they? there are no more apparently bond girls in this series. whether he has a romantic relationship in this i don't know, but it is slowly
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changing stops i am definitely gradually shifting. we have seen more strongerfemale gradually shifting. we have seen more stronger female characters in films which is definitely —— but she is definitely ruled out and being played by a woman. thank you. we're on bbc one until 10am this morning, when matt tebbutt takes over in the saturday kitchen. good morning to stop special guest todayis good morning to stop special guest today is stand—up to ring so we are happy to sit down with some lovely grub. it is bill bailey. talk about touring and your love of birds a little bit later on. we can alljoin in on that! for now let's talk about heaven and hell. food health. my food heaven would be pork ribs. big fan of them in any style. always great in our house. what about hell? i have never been a fan of cooked salmon for some reason. your face is
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saying at all. it has never done it for me. it is not really a hell but is not something i would choose. we have also got two great chefs. what is on the menu? grilled squid in a mushroom broth, and chicken fat. what is your dish? spanish-style meatballs and sherry almond bread and garlic sauce. delicious. we have 0llie here as usual. and garlic sauce. delicious. we have ollie here as usual. i am now thinking of what is the dish ben tish? future classic from australia and the little known spanish gem which everyone should enjoy. always got a which everyone should enjoy. always gota good... which everyone should enjoy. always got a good... don't forget, you are at home are able to decide what bill it's a bit later on so go to the website for booking details and we will see you at 10 i am. i am the
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absolute opposite. totally up for a bit of salmon but not so much the pork ribs. i will take it all! there are some serious shirt competition is going on there from dan walker's crazy forest shirt a bit earlier on. still to come in for breakfast this morning, can living with naked people change the way you feel about your body? morning, feel about your body? we'll ask two women taking part in the new tv series naked beach — which follows people who lack body confidence while at a naked retreat in greece. you will be surprised at the results. don't worry, we will be fully clothed when we discuss that. stay with us, up next.
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hello, this is breakfast with ben thompson and rachel burden. coming up before ten, matt will have all the weekend weather. but first at 9:31am, a summary of this morning's main news. clinics that provide cosmetic procedures, such as fillers and botox injections, are helping to fuel a mental health and anxiety epidemic. that's according to the medical director of nhs england. professor stephen powis is calling for an official register of all providers and for better training to protect vulnerable clients from quick fixes. nhs england says only 100 out of 1,000 cosmetic practitioners are currently registered. practitioners performing these
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procedures, need to be trained to make sure they can deal with psychological issues and refer anything they find on to other health care professionals, simply —— rather than simply going from procedure to procedure. sri lankan security forces have exchanged fire with suspected islamic state militants in the east of the country. reports say 15 bodies, including six children, have been found in a house where the gun battle took place. the country has remained on high alert since the easter suicide attacks on churches and hotels that killed 253 people and injured more than 500. politicians in northern ireland have been urged to do everything they can to restore power—sharing when they take part in fresh talks next month. the coalition government at stormont broke down in january 2017 and since then, the two main parties — the democratic unionists and sinn fein — have been unable to reach agreement
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on a range of issues. father martin magill, who led journalist lyra mckee's funeral service, stressed the need for peace and a resolution. more than 90 labour mps and meps — including a number of shadow ministers — have signed a letter demanding the party commits to holding another referendum on any brexit deal. labour's ruling national executive will meet on tuesday to finalise the party's manifesto for the european elections, which are due to take place in less than four weeks' time. at least 10,000 homes have been left without power in ireland as storm hannah hits the uk. weather warnings are in place for much of ireland. the storm is expected to pass through southern wales and south—west england this morning. travel disruption is highly likely. and what about the weather in the
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sport? they kept talking about it in the liverpool match last night, the 5-0 the liverpool match last night, the 5—0 win, but it didn't do much to stop them! it's a case of who blinks first, in this unprecedented title race, so it's now up to manchester city, now points behind, to respond at burnley tomorrow. andy swiss reports. all sing: liverpool, liverpool, liverpool! they may be the underdogs in the title race, but you would scarcely have guessed it. liverpool fans in bullish mood, hoping for a win to ramp up the pressure on rivals manchester city. and the hosts could afford to be confident — their opponents, huddersfield, after all, are rock bottom of the table. but surely, even they could not have dreamt of a start quite like this. liverpool ahead after just 15 seconds. blink and you'd missed it. but naby keita didn't mind, and fair to say neither did his manager. and jurgen klopp soon had
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plenty more to celebrate as his players made it look oh, so simple. the second, courtesy of sadio mane, and when just before the break mo salah added a typically sumptuous third, any lingering anfield nerves had long since vanished. surely, it was nowjust a case of how many, and while liverpool weren't quite at their best, they didn't need to be — mane with his second of the night as his side coasted to the most comfortable of wins. it was just what anfield had hoped for and it was all rounded off by salah — a 5—0 thumping and for now, at least, liverpool go top. their premier league title dream is still very much alive. so job done here for liverpool, but they will know that manchester city still have that game in hand and if they win it against burnley on sunday, they will go back on top of the table with just two matches remaining, so this enthralling title race, it seems, is heading right to the wire. andy swiss, bbc news, anfield.
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it's an outstanding group of players, obviously, and tonight, they did again very well against a huddersfield side who, i have to say, did much better than the result shows. because we had really to work hard in a lot of situations, so they defended well but especially they had proper counter attacks, so, like, and they played in short spaces and they got set pieces and all this other stuff. it was really work and so, we needed to be patient as well. the boys were that. and then, they scored wonderful goals. there's a london derby in today's early kick—off in the premier league. spurs are taking on west ham in their new stadium, but they might have half an eye on the huge champions league semifinal they have against ajax, on tuesday. it isa it is a derby, because when you play a derby, it is more than a game for ourfans, and a derby, it is more than a game for our fans, and because a derby, it is more than a game for ourfans, and because it is a massive thing playing for next
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season, to be in the top 40 is a massive achievement. the focus must be 200% we want to arrive in good condition after tuesday to be competitive again in the semifinal of the champions league. later on, cardiff will be as good as down, if they lose at fulham, and brighton beat newcastle. and in the race for seventh, and a potential europa league place, watford meet wolves. celtic can take a step closer to the scottish premiership title if they beat kilmarmock in the lunchtime kick—off. amongst the other fixtures dundee could be relegated with defeat at motherwell. congratulations as well to ross county, who sealed promotion to the premiership last night with victory over queen of the south. england's danny rose says he's lost for words, after uefa's decision to force montenegro to play their next home match behind closed doors. no fans will be allowed to watch their next euro qualifier against kosovo, after their supporters racially abused england players during the 5—1victory in montenegro last month.
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rose says it's not harsh enough. england cricketer alex hales has been suspended, following an "off—field incident". hales missed nottinghamshire's 0ne—day cup games last week, for what the county described as "personal reasons". whilst the issue is not cricket related, hales accepted that it was right, that he was suspended. it's been a dramatic start to the formula one weekend in azerbaijan. george russell's williams car hit a loose man—hole cover, causing the first practice session to be abandoned. what's more, the car was covered in fluid after the recovery truck hit a bridge on its way back to the pits. the ferraris were quickest. ahead of the final day of the jump racing season, richard johnson rode his 200th winner, as he celebrates a fourth champion jockey title. he reached the milestone in a season, for only the second time in his career at perth yesterday. he also achieved the same feat three years ago. and bryony frost has been
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passed fit to ride today, and will be crowned conditional champion — the title forjockeys under the age of 26. frost broke her collarbone, after becoming the first female jockey to win a grade one race, at the cheltenham festival over fences. she'll ride present man in today's gold cup. world snooker champion mark williams has been taken to hospital with chest pains, while playing in his second round world championship match at the crucible. the welshman fell ill after his second session against david gilbert, and is trailing 5—3. williams has tweeted, "doctors don't think it's my heart and should resume playing later today." we all hope so, and wish him a speedy recovery. newcastle remain bottom of rugby union's premiership, after losing 31 points to 17 to northampton. while sale jumped to sixth in the league, as they beat bath, is a try—less game. aj macginty kicking both sale's penalties, to keep theirfaint hopes of a top—four finish alive.
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seven years ago to the day i reported on the emerging alternative gym sport, known as crossfit, which requires speed, agility, strength and gymnastic skills. now many of the top athletes have turned professional, and i've been to meet some of the british team in manchester, who are preparing for the world crossfit games, to find out why they can now claim to be the fittest athletes on earth. elliot is the uk's fittest man, while jamie is the fittest woman in new zealand when it comes to the sport of crossfit. when they get married next winter, it should be some bomb. jamie's on another level to me at the minute, but i will get her one day. on some things. but other things, it depends. like, i prefer gymnastics and elliot's into his running, rowing — all the tall stuff. crossfit started in the usa
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in the early 2000s and aims to test an athlete's strength, speed, balance, agility and stamina across a number of challenges. what makes the crossfit games so unique for the athletes is they don't know what competition they are going to be facing until the event itself, so they do have to be prepared for anything and it's certainly brought out the inner athlete in me. for instance, in 2015, it was the pegboard that was thrown into the mix. a lot of athletes did not know what to do and, indeed, only a handful managed to complete this event. ok, thanks paul. great. that was so high! cheers, buddy. at the elite level, the british team heading to the world championships includes athletes of different ages. so, i'm 41. i got into crossfit about six years ago, so pretty late, but i've never looked back
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at a different sport. it just gets you going and that, and you can, like, really push yourself to do things that you never thought you could do. i feel like, erm, crossfit gives people a chance who feel a little bit left out in a team sport or other sports the chance to prove themselves. leading the way for the uk since this sport started is former firefighter sam briggs, world champion in 2013 and still going strong now she is a full—time professional, while also helping to promote the benefits of her sport to all. the beauty of crossfit is we take functional movements, so if you are just doing crossfit forfitness, it's gonna make you fitter for life. like sandbags over... so when you are doing the gardening, that's gonna feel so much easier. you're right. ijoined a class for people after work. it started with warm—ups and then competed in teams of two. luckily, i was paired with ex—marine andy. you take it in turns with your partner to complete the challenges faster,
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you hope, than the other teams. and variety is the name of the game as you work out all of your body. i've just been struggling since i had my second child. my body's felt like a bag of worms. so always had a back ache and shoulder ache. it's mainly, i guess, just generallyjust been feeling stronger in myself. i don't get backache any more, which is great. that's it. there we go. the end of the most gruelling routine. sorry, i'm done. that's it. i could hardly get on the box at the end. but i tell you what, i will do well the next time i'm in the garden. and is it mandatory to have your shirt off? i wouldn't subject anyone to that! and the couple getting married, and apparently crossfit will be banned at the wedding. they
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have earned it. someone will be carrying someone on have earned it. someone will be carrying someone on their shoulders by the end of it! bolton wanderers' championship match at home to brentford today has been called off, as the club's players remain on strike over unpaid wages. the already—relegated side, had hoped that a takeover, by former wolves owner laurence bassini, could have salvaged the game. we're joined in the studio by sport finance specialist, rob wilson. thanks for coming in. this is unprecedented, i know we have heard threats of this, but i cannot remember a time when players went on strike forcing the cancellation of the match, i suppose it is the ultimate protest? yes, everyone knows there is a lot of money in football, but a lot also goes straight back out, and if you're not being paid, at some point you have to say enough is enough, and they
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have had issues all season, waiting for a bailout, in petition by hmrc to be wound up, and it makes a statement to the authorities. to be wound up, and it makes a statement to the authoritiesm to be wound up, and it makes a statement to the authorities. it is a club with history, a really solid and loyal fan base, a club with history, a really solid and loyalfan base, so how has it got to this point? i know it is a complex history, but take us through it. if you look back ten, 12 years ago when they were playing in european competition, in the premier league, they were doing well, a lot of that built on the late eddie davis investing a huge amount of his own personal fortune, 35 davis investing a huge amount of his own personalfortune, 35 million or so, over the course of the tenure. when he pulled out of bolton wanderers, he took the money with him, and they still had a huge liability to other creditors, whether it was players, suppliers, and simply their expenditure was bigger than income, which is the
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basics of finance. it is a pure business issue, needing to spend now, and you hope reap the rewards later. you have all the business expenditure that you hope will be repaid, and it hasn't happened in this case. it is a horrible balance, with personal expenditure, we know more money is coming in at the end of the month, but in this case, you have to draw a line somewhere and do you generate something through a business model, or do you do what the fans want and try to bring success without getting too far behind everything else, which costs money, and when you put lots of money, and when you put lots of money into that, and it doesn't work out, the price is higher than people realise. we haven't had lots of clu bs realise. we haven't had lots of clubs go out of business properly, which is why there is this paradox about what business is and how football operates, and everything
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that goes on in the system. we have seen that goes on in the system. we have seen clubs like leeds and portsmouth, . .. there was seen clubs like leeds and portsmouth,... there was a lot of fuss yesterday afternoon on another broadcaster where he said the money is going on, and i think a lot of questions will be asked, and rightly so. questions will be asked, and rightly so. there will be discussions over what is a fit and proper person, how does due diligence happen, how do things move on? the fansjust does due diligence happen, how do things move on? the fans just want to see their team out on the pitch, which is ultimately what is important. the efl have to work out what to do because there is the bre ntford what to do because there is the brentford match cancelled, how does that affect the other teams that have already played bolton? luckily, bre ntford have already played bolton? luckily, brentford are not in a position where they can get on to the play—offs, so they are not fighting anything in particular, if they have
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anything in particular, if they have an advantage with these points. as you say, it is unprecedented, and yesterday they said they need to refer this to an independent commission, which shows they have no idea what is going to happen. the next few weeks will be fascinating, particularly if the owner takeover goes ahead. fans have bought season tickets, and that could have recourse in all of this as well. thanks for coming in, it is a really sad story. now, the weather, it is pretty wild in many parts of the country. good morning, yes, storm hannah is causing some minor travel disruption. latest warnings on the bbc website. bbc local radio is the best place for the travel. storm hannah has already peaked in strength, 82 mile an hour winds in
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wales, and we are set to see gilles across parts of england and wales and northern ireland, because if you look at the storm system, this cloud here, it is where you tend to get the strongest winds. 40, 50 male primary gusts, and winds picking up elsewhere across england through the day as the system moves eastwards. lots of rain across north wales, north—west england, and it will be cold, 7—9d. some brighter conditions along coastal counties, and some of scotla nd along coastal counties, and some of scotland will stay mainly dry. the
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wins in the highlands will be the latest. stronger winds moving across eastern parts of england this evening. the rain will gradually ease in the areas that are still wet by the end of the day, but some clearer skies developing with a ridge of high pressure. it tends to kill off the clouds, with storm hannah weakening. still some cloudy skies across london for those taking pa rt skies across london for those taking part in the marathon. good job it wasn't last weekend, and it will be a high of 14 degrees. good luck to all of you tomorrow. still some cloud throughout the day, with a chilly breeze, clouding over
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pembrokeshire and northern ireland. for most of us it will be a vastly improved day, with a bit of sunshine breaking through the cloud, with lighter winds. warmest will be in the north—west highlands, 16 or 17. in the week ahead things will turn cooler. whatever your plans, have a good day. we have had some messages about the marathon tomorrow. i want to say a quick good luck to team rachel, involving lots of people here supporting macmillan cancer research following the death of our colleague, rachael bland. just getting to the start line is a
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great achievement. let's hope the weather is onside. it's been billed as the perfect antidote to love island — with lean, bronzed bodies replaced by real—life lumps and bumps. channel 4 reality show naked beach is on a quest to make us feel better about the way we look. four body—conscious brits spend four days with confident naked people covered only with paint, before they're asked to strip naked on the beach. let's take a look. everything you're going to be doing throughout your stay is designed to improve your body image and self—esteem. it will not always be easy, but you are expected to participate. every night we want you to spend minutes alone naked in front of a mirror because research has shown that if you spend time looking at your naked body, it will make you more comfortable with it. best of luck. we hope you enjoy your
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stay. but you have your clothes on! well! what is interesting is the reaction this has had on social media. we're joined by one of the confident hosts — molly forbes — and helen trickett, one of the people needing more confidence. helen, let's just start with that, the point of this programme, and we touched on it in the introduction, is the absolute antidote to the body perfect image we see so often. how important was that for you? very important, it affected me all my life from being tiny, you grow up, you see these body perfect people, in magazines and that kind of thing, thinking i should look like that. i did crazy diets all my life. i went on holiday when i was 15 with a
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friend who was really thin, and i did not want to be the fat friend, so did not want to be the fat friend, soi did not want to be the fat friend, so i didn't eat for a long time, living off cups of tea and orange juice, and! living off cups of tea and orange juice, and i look back wondering why did that to myself. you had a moment where your children asked you why you were weighing spinach. that was me. so you were going on crazy diet regimes? i have always been body resident, i have not let it hold me back on anything, but i went through phasesin back on anything, but i went through phases in my life, like most of us, bookmarking every event, holiday, dismisses with a diet, and my turning point was a few years ago when i decided to work on changing my mind, not my body. my daughter asked me why i was weighing spinach, andl asked me why i was weighing spinach, and i had no rational answer, it was ridiculous. that's when i sort of we nt ridiculous. that's when i sort of went through the process of changing my mind and coming to the point where i ended up in body paint
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telling people that helping people like helen! can you talk us through the show, and tell us why it seems to work? i think it works for many reasons, the body paint was kind of a way to ease the guests into the ideas of seeing our bodies, but it is not about private parts, it is about body shapes, so that was one element, also there is a whole range of different bodies, there were eight of us who all felt completely comfortable and content and happy in our bodies, but we are completely different shapes and sizes, not the idealised view that you get of what is beautiful, but also a —— our personalities, we all gelled really well, and working with the guests that came out, that confidence dropped off a little. very emotional
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for a lot of people, as we have seen. for a lot of people, as we have seen. what was it like when you're first confronted with all these people body paint?|j first confronted with all these people body paint? i didn't realise, we came over the hill to go into the guests we came over the hill to go into the gu ests we re we came over the hill to go into the guests were all stood there, and i thought they were funky swimming costu mes thought they were funky swimming costumes until i got closer and thought oh, my goodness! it was amazing to see the variety of body shapes and how everyone oozed confidence. how long did it take you to lose the fear of arriving and thinking i'm going to have to take my clothes off here, and feeling more confident? the naked homework help to because i had never stood so long looking at myself before. you had to stand looking at your body for 20 minutes. the second night, you had to look at what you liked, which i struggled with. to -- 20
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minutes is a long time, some people struggle in a changing room. yes, that was massive for me. itjust gradually came throughout the week, really. you build your confidence. there was not a specific point, but i love the unicorn body paint. you have daughters, the message that comes from shows like this is so important, we are bombarded with images of people looking perfect. this is the right message, isn't it? people said to me, i cannot believe you are doing this, you're going to be naked on the tv, and i said it is notjust be naked on the tv, and i said it is not just about me be naked on the tv, and i said it is notjust about me setting a good example to my girls and about seeing me happy as i am, it is part of changing the culture that is bombarding us, it is from the moment we wake up, on our phones in the
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morning, on tv, in magazines, so it is about changing those ideas so we can be happy as we are and appreciate that all different types of bodies are beautiful, it is not just one narrow type. there is into wrong body, we are all lovely as we are. we just need to see it. has it been life changing for you? absolutely. i find been life changing for you? absolutely. ifind myself even looking at bikinis. i wore a bikini on holiday, and when we go out shopping i look at them now. ifeel more positive than myself. if you wa ke more positive than myself. if you wake up feeling rubbish, you're like that for the rest of the day, but now i feel better about myself and more confident. it is fabulous. it was so lovely to see the change in them over the week. thank you for joining us. thank you for your company today, it flew by this morning.
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until then, enjoy your weekend.
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this is bbc news, i'm shaun ley. the headlines at ten... a call for northern ireland politicians to unite to deliver on power—sharing talks — from the priest who received an ovation at lyra mckee's funeral. i get the sense that people want the politicians to move and they want them to move now. by that i mean entering into those talks and in a way that will bring a positive result at the end of them. 15 bodies and bomb—making equipment are recovered by sri lankan security forces, who're hunting those behind the easter sunday attacks. accused of fuelling a mental health epidemic — england's top doctor warns cosmetic clinics of their duty of care to vulnerable clients. jeremy corbyn is being urged by nearly 100 labour mps and meps, including shadow ministers, to back another referendum

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